Honey from two hives.

I had hoped to harvest from my Flow Hive frames this weekend and had plenty of volunteers from Northside Beekeeping Association on hand to help and celebrate with Italian Coffee and Baklava to dip into the freshly poured honey. Unfortunately a week of rain slowed up the girls so they weren’t quite ready.  

 So close! Flow frames still a week or so from harvest. 

Fortunately a check on the other frames and boxes meant that I was able to harvest in the traditional way, getting 4 full depths from H1/FH1 – Madonna’s hive and 4 Ideals from H2/B2 – Magdelan’s Hive. The B2 in Magdelan’s indicates that it was a brood box not a honey box that I extracted from. 

The only difference between the two is that a brood box sits below the Queen excluder  and a honey box or super sits above. In theory there will be a majority of bee larvae in the brood frames (with some honey and pollen used to feed the bee larvae) and 100% honey above. 

This is a simplistic explanation and not fully accurate but it is the basic theory.

While I had put on a second brood box to both hives to encourage more laying, Magdelan’s hive is using it as a honey store rather than for the queen to lay. 

Honey is so beautifully unique in that it’s taste is totally dependent on what the bees have foraged. I noticed during the extraction that Madonna’s honey look slightly opaque which indicates a good portion of buttery clover honey. Rather than mix with Magdelan, which is a lighter clearer honey, I’ve decided to keep them separate. 

  Madonna’s harvest on the right and Magdelan’s left. 

There is certainly a difference in the two but as a suburban apiary with diverse flora, it will all be mixed bloom but I hope my buyers will appreciate the uniqueness to each harvest from the girls. 

Don’t move your bees – fact or fiction??

I had been warned by many seasoned bee keepers that you moving your bees a short distance is a big no no and if absolutely necessary should be done less-than-a-meter at a time over an extended period of time. There is solid science and a lot of data to back up the cleverness of bee GPS and the importance of not mucking with the location of home, but sometimes you just don’t have a choice!

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I have been working hard to have my bee stand area paved and ready since I ordered my bees from The Bee Lady many months ago. Alas I was about a week short of the time I needed to finish the job before I went into surgery last week (yes I’m fine – thanks for asking). Of course doctors orders were that I can now do no heavy lifting for 8 weeks which made me want to weep since my back yard has been a construction zone for long enough!

My flatmate is terrific and very accommodating of the fact that I’ve become a crazy bee lady – a much tidier and less pungent smelling version of a crazy cat lady. That’s not to say he necessary likes the bees or wants to have much to do with them, but he tolerates them well enough that I can’t complain. I”m sure he would have probably obliged had I asked him every second day to move each hive a few inches each night. I’m just not sure that our happy flatmate state would have survived it.

So I took the plunge and late on Monday night and had my flatmate move one hive and again late last night move the other. The distance was not ideal – it was approximately 3 metres for the first hive and 2 metres tor the second hive to the new spot.

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The blue stand  on the left was the original site of the second hive. Enough to cause disorientation for the bees!

For most of Tuesday, I walked the stand (saw horse) between the original site and the new site, carrying a dozen or so bees at a time. I’m not sure how much good it did. By sundown there were perhaps three dozen bees that had succumbed to exhaustion from trying to find the hive without success. I had much less casualties today, probably because the new site was in their flight path to their original site. Fortunate because the original stand they were on was far too heavy for me to constantly lift back and forth carrying stray bees.

Given that there were definitely casualties from the move due to disorientation I would say with absolutely conviction that you should not move bees short distances quickly – only if doctors orders mean otherwise!!

Queen Magdelan arrives

First was Queen 3L LS (Queen Madonna that I received 11 days ago) and today I welcomed Queen 71L (Queen Magdelan) along with the nuc split from North Brisbane Bee Keepers Association’s Treasurer, John’s healthy hives from just around the corner in Geebung.

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The queen is kept inside a purpose made cage with a few of her workers which is then sealed with candy (an icing sugar type mix). It is the job of both the queen and her new bees to eat the candy out to free her which should take between 2 days and a week. This allows the hive to acclimate to her.

So it was a very busy day at Bee School with 12 new queens being introduced to 12 new Nucs so we really tested the boundaries of the established hives as each Nuc needed 2 if not 3 frames of brood as well as a good store of honey.

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A lot of hands on deck for the procedure so not nearly as stressful as I expected. Thanks bee school team!!

Benvenuti ai miei bellezze italiane

Welcome my Italian Beauties!

I’ve just taken possession of my first nuke box full of Italian Honey Bees from “The Bee Lady” Corrine in Carbrook. I wasn’t quite expecting them so early – since Queens aren’t usually available ti September, but we’ve had an unseasonably mild winter and mother nature has decided it was time.

These girls will be helping my Native bees (Tetragonula carbonaria) to help pollinate my veggie patch and keep me in a plentiful supply of golden honey.